Research highlights

Latest research summaries

Prevention of Low Back Pain

Steffens, D., Maher, C. G., Pereira, L. S. M., Stevens, M. L., Oliveira, V. C., Chapple, M., … Hancock, M. J. (2016). Prevention of Low Back Pain. JAMA Internal Medicine, 176(2), 199–199.

This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates the effectiveness of interventions for the prevention of lower back pain. 23 papers are included in the review. Findings indicate that exercise or exercise and education are effective for preventing low back pain. Interventions such as education alone, back belts, and shoe insoles are not effective in preventing low back pain.

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Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia

Gordon, R., Cremata, E., & Hawk, C. (2014). Guidelines for the practice and performance of manipulation under anesthesia. Chiropractic & Manual Therapies, 22(1), 7–7.

This guideline was created using an expert consensus process using the Delphi method to determine best practices. 16 experts participated in the consensus process and agreed upon 43 recommendation statements. The guideline presents 43 evidence-informed recommendations about the use of spinal manipulation under anesthesia in the following areas: patient selection, diagnosis, frequency and follow-up procedures, protocols for determining the frequency of the procedure, parameters for determining progress, follow-up therapy, safety, facilities, compensation, and nursing responsibilities.

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Physiotherapy Commenced Within the First Four Weeks Post–Spinal Surgery Is Safe and Effective: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Snowdon, M., & Peiris, C. L. (2016). Physiotherapy Commenced Within the First Four Weeks Post–Spinal Surgery Is Safe and Effective: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 97(2), 292–301.

The systematic review and meta analysis evaluates the safety of physiotherapy within the first 4 weeks post-spinal surgery. 4 studies, encompassing 250 participants, are included in the review. Findings indicate that physiotherapy within in the first 4 weeks post-spinal surgery was safe and reduced pain compared to a control group.

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Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review.

Rio, E., Kidgell, D., Moseley, G. L., Gaida, J., Docking, S., Purdam, C., & Cook, J. (2016). Tendon neuroplastic training: changing the way we think about tendon rehabilitation: a narrative review. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 50(4), 209–215.

This narrative review provides an overview of recent research on rehabilitation of tendinopathy. Topics discussed include: 1) motor control in tendinopathy, 2) resistance training and tendinopathy, and 3) current tendon rehabilitation. Findings of the literature review indicate that rehabilitation programs for tendinopathy should incorporate both strength training and increased motor control (see original article for details).

Access full text online at: http://bjsm.bmj.com/content/early/2015/09/25/bjsports-2015-095215.short

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THE EFFICACY OF TAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS.

Desjardins-Charbonneau, A., Roy, J.-S., Dionne, C. E., & Desmeules, F. (2015). THE EFFICACY OF TAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. International Journal of Sports Physical Therapy, 10(4), 420–433“.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4527190/.

This systematic review and meta analysis evaluates the effect of kinesiology taping (KT) and non-elastic taping (NET) for rotator cuff tendinopathy. 10 studies are included in the review. Due to the methodological issues in the original studies and because all the studies were so different from one another, the authors were unable to make a recommendation about the effectiveness of KT or NET. Some of the studies did show a positive result, so further high quality studies are needed in this area.

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